Raised by a bear who in turn was raised by an alcoholic Russian, I had an interesting childhood which makes it sometimes difficult to relate to humans who were raised by humans. I like a myriad of things which, when put together, no one else likes. This is the place where I try to explain myself in words. It may not work. I do not apologize.
And, my advice to you: take your friends to parties, but don't let parties take your friends.

 

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]


I used to do this, not quite as often as this fellow.  Think to yourself, why would you take so many photos of yourself? 

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

I used to do this, not quite as often as this fellow.  Think to yourself, why would you take so many photos of yourself? 

humansofnewyork:

"I worked at the same cafe for 28 years, but it just went out of business, so I had to find new work. Before it was like I had a family. I saw the same people every day. But now I just have a job. One day you lose something, and you say: ‘Oh my God. I was happy. And I didn’t even know it.’"

I was happy. And I didn’t even know it.

humansofnewyork:

"I worked at the same cafe for 28 years, but it just went out of business, so I had to find new work. Before it was like I had a family. I saw the same people every day. But now I just have a job. One day you lose something, and you say: ‘Oh my God. I was happy. And I didn’t even know it.’"

I was happy. And I didn’t even know it.

destroyed-and-abandoned:

View of the fashion magazines amidst the debris in the heavily battle-damaged city of St. Lo, France, August 1944. The damage was mainly caused by the Allied shelling of German forces hidden in town.

destroyed-and-abandoned:

View of the fashion magazines amidst the debris in the heavily battle-damaged city of St. Lo, France, August 1944. The damage was mainly caused by the Allied shelling of German forces hidden in town.

books0977:

Woman Reading in the Subway, New York, 1957. Photo by Inge Morath (Austrian 1923-2002). “Photography is a strange phenomenon…  You trust your eye and cannot help but bare your soul.” 
As a teenager Morath was sent to a labour camp for refusing to join Hitler’s Youth. In 1944 she worked as an interpreter for the USA. Moving to France in 1950 she began working for the Austrian photographers Ernst Haas and Erich Lessing. 

books0977:

Woman Reading in the Subway, New York, 1957. Photo by Inge Morath (Austrian 1923-2002). “Photography is a strange phenomenon…  You trust your eye and cannot help but bare your soul.” 

As a teenager Morath was sent to a labour camp for refusing to join Hitler’s Youth. In 1944 she worked as an interpreter for the USA. Moving to France in 1950 she began working for the Austrian photographers Ernst Haas and Erich Lessing.